Welcome into the warmth

Attractive and sustainable housing in a cold climate is the goal for the Attract research project. Attract, a project that aims to build low-energy buildings that withstand sub-arctic climates. The project is based on the urban transformation underway in Gällivare and Kiruna, where several districts will be moved and new ones built. The social transformation is creating both challenges and opportunities. In the Attract project, Tyréns has taken a firm grip on one of the opportunities: building housing that is cost and energy efficient, sustainable and attractive.

In the Attract project - Attractive, sustainable living environments in cold climates - solutions are being developed and tested that make it possible to build sustainable, attractive low-energy housing and outdoor environments in cold climates. Attract is being jointly run by around 15 companies, the Gällivare and Kiruna municipalities together with researchers from the Luleå University of Technology. Tyréns is involved in all three parts of the project. From pilot study to the general requirements and now, phase three is underway, when the research results will be realised in practise. The aim of this project is to produce attractive and sustainable housing without increasing the construction costs.

"We believe that we can meet increased requirements using smarter solutions and new ways of working. We want to increase the efficiency, raise the quality and reduce the number of faults. Thereby, we hope we can free-up time to be spent on creating things of value. The hope is to make it possible to develop unique and attractive housing with limited funds," Helena Markgren, business manager at Tyréns, says.

To succeed in building sustainable, low-energy, housing in a subarctic climate, all the pieces must fall into place - reduced energy consumption, reduced operating and construction costs as well as architecturally attractive homes that people want to live in. Constructing a sustainable society includes social, economic, ecological and technical aspects. In Swedish terms, the project is the largest of its kind. This is the first time low-energy buildings have been built north of the polar circle in Sweden. The challenge is in developing technology and architecture that reduces the energy consumption while being able to build the housing at a cost the functions on the housing market in Gällivare.

"Very much needs to be built in a short time, which creates opportunities for testing new innovative solutions. To succeed in building sustainable, low-energy, housing in a subarctic climate, all the pieces must fall into place, reduced energy consumption, reduced operating and construction costs as well as architecturally attractive homes that people want to live in," says Patrik Jensen, Head of Technology at Design Evolution, a Tyréns subsidiary that focuses on increasing the efficiency of the planning and design stage.